Technology Advisor Blog

Work From Home - Stay Safe On-line with Strong and Unique Passwords

Posted by Ann Westerheim on 4/24/20 4:59 PM

PW-Manager-EkaruCybercrime instances appear to have jumped sharply since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, according to the FBI. The bureau’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) reported last week that it’s now receiving between 3,000 and 4,000 cybersecurity complaints each day, up from the average 1,000 complaints per day the center saw before the pandemic. 

There are many types of threats, and many ways to stay more secure, but one simple thing is to use strong and unique passwords, facilitated by a password manager.

Can you memorize 50-80 different passwords?  The average person may use 50-80 applications that require passwords (or more!).  Each password should be strong and unique.  A strong password contains uppercase and lowercase letters, with numbers, and symbols.  The longer the password, the better.  In addition, a different password should be used for every site you visit (banking, business applications, social media, etc).  The problem is that the average person simply can't remember that much information, and what ends up happening is corners are cut.  If one site gets breached and your password ends up on the Dark Web, if you use that same password ten different places, hackers can do "credential stuffing" to gain access to other accounts.

Beware of Social Media quizzes on line.  Answering fun questions about your high school mascot, year of graduation, etc can also be used by hackers.  If you rely on dates and places to compose your passwords, they may easily be cracked.

Get a Password Manager.  With so much change pushed upon us suddenly, one simple thing you can do to gain control is to use a password manager.  A password manager assists in generating and retrieving complex passwords, potentially storing such passwords in an encrypted database or calculating them on demand. This makes it easy to store passwords securely, and you'll be able to change passwords and "remember" them.  

 

Tags: cybersecurity, remote work, work from home

Is Work From Home Causing You Back Pain?

Posted by Ann Westerheim on 4/22/20 10:13 AM

Work from Home - Ergonomics - EkaruWith the current pandemic, so many workplaces have been disrupted.  For those of us fortunate enough to have jobs that we can work from home, the hasty move to a home office has typically resulted in a less than ideal work environment.  For a week or two, we can all manage with working from the kitchen counter, but with longer shutdowns, it's time to pay more attention to a proper work set up.   

Over time, an improper work environment can result in:

  • back pain
  • neck pain
  • shoulder pain
  • eye strain
  • wrist pain - carpal tunnel syndrome can be caused by repetitive motions like typing, and can become severe enough to require surgery.  
How you sit matters!

If you've ever worked at a large corporation, you've probably gone through some ergonomics training.  At a small business, you probably didn't get formal training. 

Workplace ergonomics aims to reduce risk factors that lead to musculoskeletal injuries and allow for improved human performance and productivity.

Things to think about:

  • Your monitor should be at eye level directly in front of you.  
  • Arrange your lighting to limit glare.
  • Your chair height should be adjusted so that your knees bend at about a 90 degree angle and your feet can rest of the floor or a foot stand.
  • Your keyboard height should be adjusted so that your lower arms are approximately parallel to the floor when typing.   Your shoulders should be relaxed.

Some of the other things we recommend:

  • Set up a second monitor if you can.  Staring at a 14 inch laptop all day is not ideal for your eyes, and two monitors will greatly enhance your productivity.
  • Attach a real keyboard to your laptop.  It will be a lot easier to type all day.
  • Get up and walk around every 25 minutes, and do some stretches. Your body needs movement.
  • Consider a table top converter from VariDesk to create a stand-up work environment.  This will enable you to raise and lower your desk throughout the day.  I've been doing this for years, and I've noticed improved back health.  

Looks like work from home will be the new normal for a while.  Take some time to pay attention to your work environment to stay as productive and healthy as possible.

For more work from home tips including security and technology recommendations, visit www.ekaru.com.  

Tags: small business technology, remote work, work from home

10 Tips to Keep Cybercriminals Out While Corononavirus Keeps You In

Posted by Ann Westerheim on 4/13/20 4:02 PM

10-Tips-Keep-Criminals-Out-During-Coronavirus-EkaruOver the past several weeks, Ekaru has helped many businesses in the greater Boston area set up remote offices.  As businesses scrambled to set up a remote workforce, the initial focus was on business continuity - trying to continue operations after leaving the physical office.  Now as employees have settled in, security needs attention.  Major events like the Coronavirus pandemic create new opportunities for cybercriminals to exploit, but smart defense doesn't let them.  These tips can help keep systems and data safer in uncertain times.

  1. Get the facts.  Stay away from the rumor mill and use information from reliable sources to make business decisions in chaotic times.  There's been a big increase in emails for fake news, health information, and cures.  Go direct to trusted websites for information.
  2. Think twice before clicking links.  Make sure staffers are on the lookout for suspicious links that can lead to ransomware.   It's very easy for scammers to "spoof" a link that looks legit, but takes the user to a different location.  In fact, many dangerous emails don't even look suspicious until they're studied closely.  
  3. Be suspicious of unexpected attachments.  Ensure users only open attachments from proven, trusted sources no matter how "official" that attachment looks.  Attachments can hide computer code that can harm your system and lead to security breaches.
  4. Automate compliance.  Have one less thing to worry about by choosing a dynamic web portal system that keeps track of everything.
  5. Protect those passwords.  Encourage safe password practices like using a password manager and not writing them down on sticky notes.  The MA Data Security law requires strong passwords that are stored in a safe way.  No one can simply memorize the 50-80 passwords that typical users require these days.
  6. Beware of strange networks.  Make staffers aware of the dangers of logging in from insecure public and home WiFi networks and how to use them safely.    Watch for accidentally connecting to the wrong network, and make sure your network has a strong password, especially if you live in a crowded area.  When you click on the wireless networks symbol on your computer, you can see all the networks around you, and guess what - all of those people can see your network too.  Make sure your network is protected by a strong password.
  7. Use two-factor authentication.  An extra layer of security keeps passwords and data safe.  Typically you'll be prompted to enter a random numeric code generated on your smart phone after entering your password.  If anyone gets your password, they can't access your systems without the extra code.
  8. Keep an eye on the bad guys.  Monitor the Dark Web to watch for company data so a problem can be addressed before it becomes a crisis.  This is an early warning system that can save you from a lot of risk.
  9. Stay current on threats.  Work with a partner that's on top of today's challenges.  Awareness goes a long way to help protect your network.  
  10. Ask for help.  Consult a security expert to plan effective strategies and get innovative solutions.  There are many great options that are budget friendly.  Too many small businesses are intimidated by security.  Learn about your options.

With modern technology, we can work together to stay productive during this pandemic.  With all the disruption and anxiety, cybercriminals are sadly taking advantage of the situation, but with a focus on security, you can help protect your business.  Download the infographic.

Tags: small business, small business technology, cybersecurity, remote work

Videoconferencing from Home - What you need to know

Posted by Ann Westerheim on 4/8/20 10:58 AM

Videoconference

Many workers are taking business meetings from their living rooms or kitchens these days due to the Coronavirus pandemic.  Non-essential businesses were ordered to close, and encouraged to continue operations remotely when possible.  Many small businesses have gotten very creative to find new ways to operate and survive the crisis.   
 
Traditional telephone conversations and email enable workers to conduct business remotely, but only with limited collaboration. Video communication, on the other hand, makes it possible for you to talk directly with the people who matter most without missing all of those non-verbal cues that mean so much. With videoconferencing, you can enjoy the benefits of face-to-face interaction, no matter how far away you may be.  Beyond the productivity enhancements, video also helps satisfy the social interaction many workers start to crave when working from home.

Here's what you need to know about video conferencing:

What you need: 

There are may popular business tools for remote meetings such as Microsoft Teams, GoToMeeting, Zoom, and more.  At Ekaru we use GoToMeeting because it's integrated with our phone system, but there are many other choices.  The person who hosts the meeting will need the application, and the other participants can join without purchasing anything.  You'll also need a camera and microphone (or headset).  Most modern laptops have a camera and microphone built in already.  All participants also have the option to dial into a phone number as well.  If you have a desktop computer, you can get an inexpensive webcam with built-in microphone.  These are very easy to install.  

Dress Appropriately:
It's usually appropriate to dress a bit more comfortably when working from home, but don't over do it.  It may be fun to joke about working in your PJs, but it doesn't signal a professional work ethic.  Maintain your company's culture and dress code, and tailor your appearance for the person you're working with.  A check in call with co-workers is pretty different from a sales presentation to a prospective customer.
 
Get over your fear of being on camera:
Video calls work best when everyone gets on.  If you're not used to being on video calls, it can be intimidating to be on camera, but the calls work much better when there's full participation.  You'll have the opportunity to preview your video before sharing.  Also, learn how to quickly mute your video should you ever need to.  It's ok to be awkward on your first few calls.  Give it some time and you'll be more comfortable.
 
Lighting:
Experiment a bit with lighting to look your best.  You'll always be able to preview what you look like before connecting, and continue to view while you're on the call.  Watch for too much saturation with direct sunlight, and too little lighting which just looks depressing.  You'll want good lighting to be able to see facial expressions.
 
Arrange an appropriate background:
If you have space in your home for a home office, that certainly makes it a lot easier to find a place to join a video call.  But if you don't have the space, and have to juggle multiple people working from home, its ok to use another location - maybe a kitchen table or sofa.  If you work from a bedroom, adjust your camera to keep the bed out of view.  Also, make sure the background isn't too distracting and put away personal items that may be embarrassing.  During the current crisis, its ok if your background looks like a home, and sometimes the personal touch leads to some new connections like meeting a pet.  Try to set up in a area where other family members won't be caught by surprise on camera.  It's a good idea to let others know in advance that you'll be on a video call.
 
Make introductions:
Anyone joining the call should introduce themselves.  In the event that some people can't connect by video, its important that they announce themselves when joining the call.  A good rule of thumb is to follow the etiquette you'd follow if you're all in the same room.  It would be pretty awkward for someone to sneak in to a conference room, hide in the corner, and secretly listen to a meeting.  That's the equivalent of joining a call and not introducing yourself.
 
Limit your distractions:
Remember you're on camera, and its just as rude to be checking your phone or email while someone else is talking as it would be in an in-person meeting.  I like to make sure my own video is always showing on my screen so I always remember I'm on camera.  It's very disrespectful to not give the person talking your full attention.
 
Know how to mute (fast!) and end the meeting:
A good rule of thumb is all users should be on mute except when they're speaking.  This will cut down on background noise.  I've been on calls when a participant picked up a call phone call and started talking to another person, oblivious to the fact that everyone else on the call could hear.  (Note that the host can mute a participate if needed).  If an emergency comes up, get familiar with both the audio AND video mute button.  Also, at the end of the meeting, be sure to fully exit.  This is especially important for the host!  You won't want to be sharing your video and desktop for the rest of the day!
 
Security:
Zoom usage has spiked twenty-fold in the past weeks, and many security concerns have been in the news, including a warning from the FBI. If you use Zoom, use unique meeting codes, a password to protect the meeting, and don't record the meeting.  We also recommend covering your camera when not in use.
 
We're all wired to adapt.  For those of us who have jobs that can continue remotely, this is a blessing, and make the most of it.  Get creative and try to be your best every day.  

Tags: small business, Managed Services, remote work

Supporting Local Small Businesses During COVID-19

Posted by Ann Westerheim on 4/6/20 11:37 AM

Checklist - Ekaru

Over the past two weeks, Ekaru engineers have closed over 1,000 tickets as we helped local businesses transition to work from home and remain as productive as possible. 

Information Technology is classified as an "essential service" and Ekaru remains fully available to support our community, while following social distancing protocols.  Please refer to the list of Covid 19 Essential Services that are exempted from the Massachusetts emergency order. 

Ekaru is fully configured to work through situations like this.  We have previously established a disaster recovery plan and leveraged technology to maintain full functionality to work remotely.  We are also fully committed to mitigating the risk of exposure to and transmission of the virus.  

Please call for urgent support issues, and email for non-urgent issues.  Most support calls that we would have gone on site for will now be handled remotely, and for urgent issues that require an onsite visit, we'll follow protocols from the CDC.

Here are some of the things our engineers have been working on:

  • Helping our clients with transitioning to work at home, including access via LogMeIn, VPN, or access to VoIP phone systems, as well as online tools such as remote meeting / conferencing tools.
  • Helping advise our clients on ways to reduce the risk of accessing corporate information from likely very insecure home systems not protected by approved security antivirus, without up to date security patches for operating systems, and possibly infected with malware.
  • Educating our clients on, and protecting them from, the new Corona virus scams, fake websites, and phishing emails by malware creators to take advantage of the current situation. So, in addition to human virus issues, there are cyber-virus infections related the COVID-19.  One staffer opening a map of Coronavirus cases from a phishing email or a healthcare worker’s cracked password could give cybercriminals the ability to deploy ransomware to shut down critical systems right when we need them the most.  
  • We are also mostly all working at home ourselves and trying to do as much as possible remotely to avoid having to do onsite visits, but still keeping systems up and running.

We're here to help.  If you have any questions, please let us know.   Every situation is unique and we're here to support you. 

Here are some links to additional resources:

Videos:

3/27/2020 - Video - How to Spot a Phishing eMail

3/27/2020 - Video - How to Launch a Video Call

Blogs:

4/3/2020:  VoIP Telephony - e911 and Staying Connected During the COVID-19 Crisis

4/3/2020:  How to Get the IT Management Services You Need During the COVID Outbreak 

4/2/2020:  Three Tips to for Working Remotely to Help Your Team Stay Productive

3/27/2020:  COVID-19 Remote Work Tips

Together we can all work through this crisis.  

 

 

 

Tags: Managed Services, remote work

How to Get the IT Management Services You Need During the COVID Outbreak

Posted by Ann Westerheim on 4/3/20 12:18 PM

IT management services

With the large majority of still-open businesses now working remotely, you may be experiencing a sudden need for IT support that you no longer have easy access to. Getting the IT management services and support you need when working in an office is one thing, but getting it when your entire team is spread across any number of locations is a far more complicated matter.

But that doesn’t mean the help you and your team need is beyond reach! The coronavirus pandemic is dramatically affecting the way we all do business. If you’re struggling to find the enterprise IT services and support your team needs to keep itself going, Ekaru can help to extend your reach. 

Here’s how we can provide the IT management services you need during these unprecedented circumstances.

On-Demand IT Support When You Need It

Small to medium-sized businesses are in an especially tough place right now. Not only are they having to quickly adjust to the lifestyle of a remote workforce, but they may also be struggling to equip themselves with the tools and services that were previously only located in the office.  Many companies didn’t have a fully built-out remote function in place at the time of this sudden outbreak.

This is where Ekaru is best positioned to help. Our team of engineers and experts can offer 24/7 and on-demand IT support for all of your remote workforce’s needs. 

Have you run into a tech emergency (like a network that’s suddenly shut down) and need help with damage control to keep operations running? Or maybe one of your employees has run into a roadblock, and you don’t know how to help them through it? With Ekaru, a technology advisor is only a phone call away.

Reliable (and Remote) IT Management Services

Working remotely can introduce a wide variety of challenges. The pace of a remote workforce will take immediate adjustments. You rely on technology for everything as part of a remote team, so if something goes wrong, it can feel like you’re on your own—it’s not like you can ask your co-worker the next desk over for help.

This is why it’s so valuable to have remote IT management services you can rely on. If your laptop isn’t running the company’s preferred software for reasons you can’t pinpoint, then you can call your Ekaru technology advisor and they’ll help you troubleshoot a solution. 

The need for remote technology support is stronger than ever, and you don’t want to spend time on the phone, waiting for someone to pick up; you’ve got enough to do already. When you work with Ekaru, our 24/7 help desk is always going to be there for you when you need us. 

You can also set up scheduled appointments with your Ekaru technology advisor. This will help you rest easy knowing that there’s a reserved time for you to work with us to maintain the status quo, assess how things are going, and preemptively address any issues that could be coming down the pipeline.

The COVID outbreak is changing a lot of things. If your remote workforce is struggling to deal with the transition (and the many technological roadblocks that can rear their ugly head), then get in touch with us today! We’d love to help you get the IT management services, support, and guidance you need to keep your company running at full steam.

Tags: Managed Services, computer support, remote work

3 Tips for Working Remotely to Help Your Team Stay Productive

Posted by Ann Westerheim on 4/2/20 11:27 AM

tips for working remotely

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically changed the way companies operate. And as a result, your workforce may have become a remote workforce almost overnight. While this is a necessary change to keep employees safe, if your team isn’t used to remote work, they’re likely to encounter some challenges as they adapt to this new way of doing things.

As of March 17th, a Gartner Inc. survey “found that 88% of organizations have encouraged or required employees to work from home, regardless of whether or not they showed coronavirus-related symptoms” and “nearly all organizations (97%) have canceled work-related travel.” So, regardless of how long your team has been working remotely, you’re far from alone.

To help you figure out the best way to handle remote team management, and to assist your team as they stay productive and motivated, we’ve put together a few tips for working remotely that we hope will help you adapt to this “new normal.” 

1. Prioritize a Remote Office Setup

For someone who hasn’t learned how to work remotely, it can be challenging to set up a designated “workspace” in an environment usually reserved for after-work activities. Business Insider says it like this: “One of the biggest challenges of working from home is setting up a home office with the right tools, but once you've got everything in place, it's easier to get your work done.” 

Working remotely means you can be flexible with where you get your work done, but that flexibility can blur the lines between work and home life. It may sound redundant to tell your team to designate a specific space in their home for work, but setting up a single location for work—the same way they’d have a desk in the office where they get most of their work done—can help your team get into the kind of mindset that will keep them motivated throughout the day.

2. Equip Your Team with the Right Remote Working Tools

Having a remote workforce often means not having access to the usual bevy of tools and technology that team members may be accustomed to. Even if they have their work computers with them, they may feel like they’re missing some of the equipment they need to do their work.

To supplement your team, make sure they’re equipped with the right remote working tools. Things like video conferencing platforms (Zoom, GoToMeeting, etc.), messaging apps (Slack, GroupMe), and any number of other remote working tools can help your team benefit from what HBR calls “a ‘richer’ technology” that provides team members with “many of the visual cues that they would have if they were face-to-face.”

You’re also going to want to make sure the tools your team uses are well-maintained and up-to-date. And if they’re not, or if they run into obstacles at any point in their day-to-day, that they have access to the kind of technology help they need to get up and running again. Even if you can’t help them yourself, there are plenty of third-party resources (like Ekaru!) who can jump in and help resolve whatever issues show up.

3. Schedule Regular Check-Ins

Communicating with your team is going to be more relevant than ever. “This could take the form of a series of one-on-one calls, if your employees work more independently from each other,” as HBR advises, or it could be a daily check-in with the whole team to see how everyone’s doing.

The important thing is that your remote workforce knows that they’re not on their own and that their questions and concerns will be heard. Not only will this keep up your company’s sense of culture, but it’s also one of those tips for working remotely that’s easy to implement and can go a long way toward encouraging employees to stay productive and on track.

Tags: productivity, Time Management, remote work

Keep Your Company Running Smoothly with Ekaru’s Enterprise IT Services

Posted by Ann Westerheim on 4/1/20 12:11 PM

enterprise IT services

Companies across industries are experiencing unprecedented stress and pressure right now on account of the COVID-19 pandemic. Offices are shutting down, employees are working remotely, and the sense of structure your team was accustomed to may be starting to feel like a distant memory. 

These dramatic changes are hitting small to medium-sized businesses especially hard, as they may not have the same kinds of internal resources that are available to a larger corporation. This rings particularly true when it comes to remote IT services for small businesses. And since your newly remote workforce needs consistent and reliable access to the tech and tools that help them do their jobs, this can prove challenging.

If you’re looking for remote IT support for small business teams, then Ekaru is here to help. We know how stressful our current situation is, and we’re committed to providing enterprise IT services so you and your team can keep your company fully operational. Here’s just a glimpse into what form our enterprise IT services can take: 

Data Backup, Recovery, & Disaster Prevention

Your company’s data is the backbone of your entire organization. Without it, you might as well be adrift at sea. And with most teams now working remotely, you need to make sure your company not only has access to the data they need (more on that in a moment) but also that that data is secure, backed up, and not at risk to disappear when it’s needed most.

At Ekaru, we operate off of a “Prevent, Detect, Recover” strategy for your data. We’ll work alongside you and your team to identify essential data, outline a backup plan (and train users to implement it when needed) that will fit your budget, regularly monitor your data backups, run tests to make sure everything is running smoothly, and if worse comes to worst, support you in the data recovery process.

Easy-to-Access Cloud Storage

For a remote workforce to truly thrive, it needs to access any data it may need whenever it may need it. With Ekaru’s services, you’ll be able to get into your files from anywhere you are and from any device that you may be using. 

This means you can share data across your business and synchronize files with your team so you’ll never encounter an out-of-date document again. Our cloud storage services will protect your data with an AES 256 encryption, so you can rest easy knowing that your data is securely stored away in a place only the people you want to access it can access it.

Remote Enterprise IT Services For All Your Needs

Not every company has access to the full range of enterprise IT services and support they may need, and Ekaru wants to bridge that gap. We’ve made it our primary mission to provide enterprise IT services for small businesses, medium-sized businesses, and anyone who needs an extra bit of technical expertise. 

Where some IT support teams operate off of a “break/fix” mentality—where you have to wait for something to go wrong before they can help—Ekaru’s philosophy is centered on constantly and proactively monitoring and maintaining your network so your business stays productive, no matter what

You don’t need an entire IT department to stay afloat during these trying times. With our team of highly-trained technology professionals on your side, your small to medium-sized business can have the highest quality remote IT support at a price that works for your company’s budget. We have the enterprise IT management tools and solutions you need to meet all of your IT needs and to help you continue to make strides toward the continued pursuit of your business goals.

Tags: data backup, cloud, data security, remote work

COVID-19 - Remote Work Tips

Posted by Ann Westerheim on 3/27/20 5:03 PM

COVID-19As everyone works together to "flatten the curve" via social distancing, many workers are scrambling to work from home on short notice.  We've been fielding a lot of questions and put together some of the answers here in one post.

If you're new to video conferencing, don't be intimidated.  Most modern laptops have a webcam and microphone built in, so you don't even need any extra equipment.  Here's a short video showing how to launch a GoToMeeting call - as you'll see in the two minute video, its very simple.  It may take a little practice, but after a few tries you'll be comfortable:

GoToMeeting is our recommended solution for conducting video and screen-sharing calls.  A couple of things to remember if you're new to video conferencing.   

  • Mute your microphone when you're not talking. This will cut down on distracting background noise especially in large groups.
  • Take care to set up in a location with an appropriate background
  • View your own video so you know what you look like
  • Keep your own video view-able, you do don't forget you're on camera. You may not want all your colleagues seeing you snack while on the call.
  • Get familiar with the audio and video mute buttons.  You may need to use them and its awkward to fumble on camera.
  • Remember to CLOSE the meeting when you're done!  Or you may be sharing your screen the rest of the day!
  • Keep your laptop camera covered when not in use.

Non-profits, municipalities, and healthcare organizations can get a 90 day remote work kit - Contact us if you'd like us to help you get access.  Please put "Emergency Remote Work Kit" in the subject line.

Always keep security and privacy in mind when you're conducting conference calls or video calls.  There are other great remote collaboration tools available, but please keep in mind that the free versions may not be appropriate for business calls.  Zoom has been in the news recently for some privacy concerns - https://www.consumerreports.org/video-conferencing-services/zoom-teleconferencing-privacy-concerns/

NIST has also put together an excellent list of security recommendations in an infographic:  Conference Call Security Graphic

Don't be intimidated by technology, and remember security and privacy as you adjust to remote work.

Tags: cybersecurity, remote work

Technology Tips and Advice for Remote Workers

Posted by Ann Westerheim on 3/19/20 12:16 PM

Home office - PCWorking remotely has become a necessity for many with the Coronavirus outbreak. The technology that enables many to work remotely is a great benefit to keeping many businesses operational, but it also poses many new risks for the security of your organization’s data. For example, if an employee-owned device (laptop, PC, etc.) is connected to the company’s network and contains a virus or malware, they could be spread to your company’s network. Additionally, it becomes more of a challenge to verify the legitimacy of emails (for example, you’re no longer right down the hall from your CEO who requested an unusual wire transfer), you may be unfamiliar with policies and procedures as they pertain to a work from home environment, and the list goes on.

We’ve developed a list of guidelines and tips to assist you as you prepare to work from home in a safe, functional work environment. Note, this list is intended for guidance and information purposes only. If you have any questions regarding these tips, please reach out to us for additional information.

Guidelines & Tips
  • Secure workspace
    • Ensure you have the ability to lock your devices (laptop, PC, etc.) and any business relevant information when not in use. Use the keyboard shortcut “Windows Button” + “L” to lock your screen when not in use.  Right at the moment, none of us are mobile, but in normal times, cable locks for laptops should be used when necessary. Laptops and devices should be locked out of sight and/or in the trunk if it must be left in a vehicle unattended
    • Avoid using your personal devices for work-related business.  Best case scenario is a company issued laptop with full security or a dedicated home office system with full security.  Use separate accounts if you have to share a computer in the case of an emergency.
    • Safely perform conversations without visitors eavesdropping or shoulder surfing, especially if you deal with protected information.  This is a bigger issue in “normal” times in a mobile setting like a coffee shop, but keep in mind that any regulated information has to stay protected ALWAYS.  
    • Protect the data you are accessing by using a VPN to log into the company network, and ensure you are protecting data visible on your screen with a screen protector. This is especially critical for employees who are required to be HIPAA compliant, PCI compliant, etc. 
    • Restrict the use of devices containing business-relevant information. Do not let family members, friends, or anyone but yourself use company-owned devices or personal devices used for business purposes
    • Use strong unique passwords on all your devices and accounts to prevent unauthorized access
  • Wireless Security
    • Change default Wi-Fi Router passwords
    • Enable WPA-2 or higher encryption 
    • Ensure your local router firmware is up to date
    • Limit the use of public Wi-Fi. Always use a VPN when connecting to public Wi-Fi. Never use public Wi-Fi to send sensitive information without a VPN 
  • Ensure all personal devices are secure with company-provided or personally owned antivirus and anti-malware software company 
  • Updated IOT Device firmware (smart thermostats, surveillance cameras, etc.) 
  • Ensure default passwords are changed 
  • Ensure the software on all devices within your home network is kept up to date (corporate laptop, IOT devices such as cameras and smart thermostats, personal laptops/tablets, etc.)
  • Review and follow corporate Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) and other relevant policies and procedures
AWARENESS 
  • Remote Work Employee Awareness
    • Be extremely cautious of email phishing scams
    • Limit social media use
    • Don’t reveal business itineraries, corporate info, daily routines, etc.
So many of our normal schedules and routines are temporarily disrupted.  Sadly, cyber criminals are taking advantage of this, and fake Coronavirus maps are being circulated containing malware, and there have even been some reports of ransomware attacks at hospitals.  Please remind everyone on your team to “think before you click”.  
 
Also, something we’re thinking about a lot these days, is that we’re grateful for the ability to keep doing our work remotely, and we’re acutely aware that for many, remote work is a luxury out of reach, and the crisis has a much harsher financial impact.  We’re all in this together, and we’re here to help in any way we can.

Tags: cybersecurity, remote work

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